Pakistan Stars XI-International XI matches in Karachi a cause for celebration and praise

Just as Matthew Hayden was giving us one reason to look at cricket with fond eyes and a glimmer of excitement found once again, Pakistan and the International XI who have agreed to play there gave us another. By bringing stars such as Ricardo Powell, Sanath Jayasuria and Andre Nel to Karachi for two T20 matches against a Pakistan XI, the Sindh government has shown that terrorism and political machinations can only go so far in quashing the enduring love of the game in that country and amongst its wider constituents. Jayasuria’s presence is especially heartwarming, as it was the Sri Lankan team who were on the receiving end of that heinous attack in 2009 that put an end to international cricket in Pakistan until this weekend. Since then, I completed one and a half years of my university education, received my degree, travelled for seven-odd months and did a full year’s professional work. Such has been the gravity of the length of time in which the people of Pakistan have been starved of cricket, made worse by a country whose electrical shortages mean the national team cannot be followed with any degree of ease during their foreign tours.

Pakistan is probably not safe enough for international cricket to return with a full schedule yet, and while these matches may help, one has to hope that the contingency plans and security blueprints drawn up are of the highest quality. However, balancing such reductive fears is the contention by Arsene Wenger after the Mumbai terror attacks led to calls for England’s cricket team to return home from India that “we cannot let our lives be ruled by fear.” Otherwise, societies and people would never take the bold steps that are behind progress, and in sporting terms, behind staging the kind of spectacles that make a difference in people’s lives. Cricket in Pakistan has suffered countless body blows in recent times and been wracked by internal strife and division; in the face of this, it heartening to see help forthcoming from members of the international cricket community, and also to witness constituents of Pakistan society such as the Sindh government and cricketers themselves unite in service of their country and the sport that has been a source of such passion and positivity there. Here’s hoping the matches pass off safely, generate a great amount of attention from the public and slowly but surely help with the reintegration of Pakistani grounds on the international fixture list. If all goes according to plan, it should be a celebration of cricket as an enduring force of good against the more destructive influences that have sought to cut off its proximity and benefit to the Pakistani people.

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