Chelsea’s conduct in the John Terry affair of the lowest order

Of all the accusations and finger-pointing doing the rounds in the John Terry firestorm, Chelsea are almost as deserving of blame as the player. Their actions in attempting to deceive and insult the intelligence of everyone from the FA to the criminal justice system, the anti-racism campaign and the fans, have merely reinforced the impression that they are a club run along mafia lines favouring cronyism and protection of their own above truth and what they owe to the wider public. First, it was revealed that club secretary David Barnard had deliberately changed Ashley Cole’s witness statement to include that he had heard Anton Ferdinand use the word “black” when accusing John Terry of racially insulting him, when Cole had in fact initially stated hearing no such thing. This was a key (and false) alteration, as Terry’s line of defence rested on repeating abusive words that Ferdinand had accused him of saying in order to deny using them (i.e. “I didn’t call you a so-and-so”). Secondly, Chelsea then relented under overwhelming pressure to coax a statement of apology from Terry that nonetheless allowed him to omit acknowledging that he had ever directed racial language to Anton Ferdinand. Finally, they told the fans that they punished him but refused to reveal what those sanctions entailed, citing comparisons with the HR department of any company that would ordinarily refrain from revealing to the public any penalties it had imposed on its employees.

The difference between ordinary companies and Chelsea Football Club – of which they are well aware – is that football clubs have always been unique companies that are more beholden to the public than most corporates. They rely on the public to purchase their shirts, ordinary people to buy their season tickets, but also to maintain an intangible connection that has always gone beyond business into the realm of absolute loyalty. Yet in trying to use the specious analogy of an ordinary company obeying best practice in HR policy, Chelsea have insulted the intelligence of those loyal fans who might feel it their right to know what kind of punishment they have meted out to John Terry to preserve the image of their club.

The extent to which Chelsea were prepared to go to protect a handful of senior players was revealed in the brutal manner of their sacking of Andre Villas Boas last season, and has once again been on display in this tawdry episode. Yet there are some things that are greater than a single player, and even if Chelsea were now to side with the public in the name of a commitment to anti-racism and professionalism, it would seem like a political move undertaken after a careful, self-serving weighing of the pros and cons. Defend your player if you must, try not to mislead courts and commissions if you can help it, but please oh please don’t insult the intelligence of fans by claiming that you cannot reveal the sanctions the club imposed because of your commitment to high standards of company HR policy. Football has never existed within the realm of ordinary society, and public figures have always prompted public judgements. It is time Chelsea stopped acting so shiftily and talked straight with their fans, if not the general footballing public.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s