Turning a blind eye to ever-increasing signs that cricket is gripped by corruption will end badly

Although the ICC have offered plausible explanations for why they have commented so little on the sting that caught out six umpires involved in and around the World T20, it is still noticeable how quickly that story has faded. Cricket is not a sport that can afford to treat stories on how those meant to be in charge of protecting the laws of the game were willing to cheat with short-term, absentee memories. The accumulated drip-drip nature of scandalous revelations regarding match-fixing has reached levels now where it is not unreasonable to fear that corruption is endemic and entrenched behind the scenes, stretching from players to officials, boards to governing bodies. The three Pakistan players that were caught out in 2010 tends to drown out the whispers surrounding certain Sri Lankan players for some time now; the involvement of the South African team around the turn of the century is recalled when one considers the exile of Marlon Samuels for two years for providing information to bookmakers; Danish Kaneria’s lifetime ban from county cricket has parallels to allegations of fixing in the Indian Premier League. Put together, cricket has a serious problem. One has only to look at the extraordinary success with which Lance Armstrong covered his tracks for so long in cycling to know that it is foolish to presume that all is as it seems in a sport, or as its protagonists would have us believe.

Yet no-one is asking the hard questions in the weeks following the bombshell news about the umpires. Why is it still only independent news channels that are making us aware of a greater problem behind the scenes, with the game’s governing body always playing catch-up? Does the fact that umpires who are sanctioned by the ICC are corruptible mean we have to consider the sincerity of commitment of a financially-dependent institution to tackling wealthy mafias that have always preyed on cricket? If the International Cycling Union aided and abetted Armstrong in getting away with his crimes for so long, there is no reason for cricket fans to place their trust in an organisation that has so far failed to deliver results in the fight against corruption and has often seemed more willing to turn a blind eye than shed a light on the sport’s ugly side.

Sportsmen have always had a code of silence when it comes to protecting their world. No-one inside golf ever felt the need to spill the beans on Tiger Woods’s real personality behind the carefully packaged image; more regrettably, the ominous code of omerta enforced in cycling meant that many were prepared to take the secrets of Armstrong and his allies to “the grave” (in Tyler Hamilton’s words). It would be extremely interesting to be a fly on the wall in most cricket dressing-rooms, and hear what players have to say about the match-fixing disease away from the cameras. Rather than expressing the same amount of shock as they did to the public about the Pakistan scandal in 2010, the regrettable suspicion abides that some might have been laughing at how foolish they were to have been caught.

If the ICC continues to deal with match-fixing on a case-by-case basis, rather than designing a comprehensive program to smoke out and clear out every place in the game in which corruption has taken a hold, cricket will suffer a body blow from which its fragile popularity may not recover. The number of fans who have turned away from the game in Pakistan as a result of the failure to protect – and subsequent banishment – of two of its best cricketers should not be underestimated; if that was merely the tip of the iceberg, cricket needs to know now because the longer corruption is allowed to fester in the game, the worse the ramifications will eventually be.

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